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Wrong expressions

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Conflict On August 10, 2020




Alcalá de Henares, Spain
#1New Post! Aug 14, 2018 @ 19:00:55
I've created this thread in order to seek aid when I or others hear people say things that don't make sense. I'm a practiced listener and I pick up many things. One of them is a remark made by a WWE Diva, whose name I wish to keep anonymous for reasons of discretion and not wishing to take part in the rather debased social media practice of gossiping about people.

This person said regarding her daughter, 'when she's eighteen and she's out of my house...'

Uh, please explain this. Her daughter is going to be out of her mother's house long before eighteen. With a decent upbringing, she'll go to school on her own as early as 11, as I did, she'll go out partying with friends, visit other family members, go on school trips and so on. So, out of the house is obviously the wrong expression to use in this context. The right one would be, 'when she leaves home.'

Why did this diva make such a mistake?
mrmhead On about 2 hours ago




NE, Ohio
#2New Post! Aug 14, 2018 @ 19:09:44
@Conflict Said

I've created this thread in order to seek aid when I or others hear people say things that don't make sense. I'm a practiced listener and I pick up many things. One of them is a remark made by a WWE Diva, whose name I wish to keep anonymous for reasons of discretion and not wishing to take part in the rather debased social media practice of gossiping about people.

This person said regarding her daughter, 'when she's eighteen and she's out of my house...'

Uh, please explain this. Her daughter is going to be out of her mother's house long before eighteen. With a decent upbringing, she'll go to school on her own as early as 11, as I did, she'll go out partying with friends, visit other family members, go on school trips and so on. So, out of the house is obviously the wrong expression to use in this context. The right one would be, 'when she leaves home.'

Why did this diva make such a mistake?


Won't she be leaving home when she goes to visit friends and family?


In context, (I think) I fully understood "when she's 18 and out of my house", though it may be a colloquialism.

Maybe the verbosely accurate statement would be "When she's 18 and she moves out of my house ..."
or as some parents may say "When she's 18 and I kick her out of my house ..."
(again, not a literal "kick" .... usually)
twilitezone911 On March 25, 2019




Saint Louis, Missouri
#3New Post! Aug 14, 2018 @ 19:17:53
@Conflict Said

I've created this thread in order to seek aid when I or others hear people say things that don't make sense. I'm a practiced listener and I pick up many things. One of them is a remark made by a WWE Diva, whose name I wish to keep anonymous for reasons of discretion and not wishing to take part in the rather debased social media practice of gossiping about people.

This person said regarding her daughter, 'when she's eighteen and she's out of my house...'

Uh, please explain this. Her daughter is going to be out of her mother's house long before eighteen. With a decent upbringing, she'll go to school on her own as early as 11, as I did, she'll go out partying with friends, visit other family members, go on school trips and so on. So, out of the house is obviously the wrong expression to use in this context. The right one would be, 'when she leaves home.'

Why did this diva make such a mistake?



legally, that a parent can kick out a child out of the house at 18, not against the law. the parent doesn't have let the child live at the home for free.

the parent tell the child to get a job, maybe not paid rent, if the child go to college. the child need to have a job, not only learn about the real world to have spending money for their selves.

wwe diva was right to said that about her child, nothing wrong with the statement.
Conflict On August 10, 2020




Alcalá de Henares, Spain
#4New Post! Aug 14, 2018 @ 20:33:32
@mrmhead Said

Won't she be leaving home when she goes to visit friends and family?


In context, (I think) I fully understood "when she's 18 and out of my house", though it may be a colloquialism.

Maybe the verbosely accurate statement would be "When she's 18 and she moves out of my house ..."
or as some parents may say "When she's 18 and I kick her out of my house ..."
(again, not a literal "kick" .... usually)


So, she meant to say when she moves out of my house? Why did she not say move? What colloquialism is 'out of my house?' It's not one I've heard before.

Also, why does she say 'my house?' At the time she was being interviewed with her sister. I'm guessing she'd have said 'our house', had her husband been around. Still, I'm a little bugged by the possessive nature of the statement. 'my house.' Isn't the house shared by parents and children until they strike out on their own? The kids will leave, but the parents will still be living in their home, so the aspect of sharing will still exist.

@twilitezone911 Said

legally, that a parent can kick out a child out of the house at 18, not against the law. the parent doesn't have let the child live at the home for free.

the parent tell the child to get a job, maybe not paid rent, if the child go to college. the child need to have a job, not only learn about the real world to have spending money for their selves.

wwe diva was right to said that about her child, nothing wrong with the statement.


I understand that. It's done and I myself would do it. I'd rather my kids make it on their own when they're eighteen, as they would be fresh from the vine so to speak and learn to be independent before their full mental development at 25, or 30, in some men's cases. The point was the way the idea was put. The missing word move changed the meaning in my mind, as did the possessive 'my house' word, making the notion seem a little selfish.
twilitezone911 On March 25, 2019




Saint Louis, Missouri
#5New Post! Aug 14, 2018 @ 21:40:05
@Conflict Said

So, she meant to say when she moves out of my house? Why did she not say move? What colloquialism is 'out of my house?' It's not one I've heard before.

Also, why does she say 'my house?' At the time she was being interviewed with her sister. I'm guessing she'd have said 'our house', had her husband been around. Still, I'm a little bugged by the possessive nature of the statement. 'my house.' Isn't the house shared by parents and children until they strike out on their own? The kids will leave, but the parents will still be living in their home, so the aspect of sharing will still exist.



I understand that. It's done and I myself would do it. I'd rather my kids make it on their own when they're eighteen, as they would be fresh from the vine so to speak and learn to be independent before their full mental development at 25, or 30, in some men's cases. The point was the way the idea was put. The missing word move changed the meaning in my mind, as did the possessive 'my house' word, making the notion seem a little selfish.



I moved out from my mom at 28, I was asked to leave. my sisters and brother told my mother and I were a marriage, not as bad as that, both of us need to move on with our lives separate. the honeymoon was way over. we stayed close we live three blocks away from each other.

a parent would tell their child, that is " my house " , because the child lived there from free. he or she never paid a dime to live there. my house is the right word for a parent to said in this case.
Conflict On August 10, 2020




Alcalá de Henares, Spain
#6New Post! Aug 21, 2018 @ 13:32:24
Well, after considering the matter, we could lightheartedly make humor out of this expression. For example,

My daughter's got to leave our house, she's not what she was anymore. Now she's a rigid giant that can't go into all the small spaces she used to anymore. What an overgrown monster.
Cpat92 On August 07, 2020
It's all or nothing





Lauderhill, Florida
#7New Post! Aug 21, 2018 @ 14:47:10
@Conflict Said

I've created this thread in order to seek aid when I or others hear people say things that don't make sense. I'm a practiced listener and I pick up many things. One of them is a remark made by a WWE Diva, whose name I wish to keep anonymous for reasons of discretion and not wishing to take part in the rather debased social media practice of gossiping about people.

This person said regarding her daughter, 'when she's eighteen and she's out of my house...'

Uh, please explain this. Her daughter is going to be out of her mother's house long before eighteen. With a decent upbringing, she'll go to school on her own as early as 11, as I did, she'll go out partying with friends, visit other family members, go on school trips and so on. So, out of the house is obviously the wrong expression to use in this context. The right one would be, 'when she leaves home.'

Why did this diva make such a mistake?



My apologies for the late reply, but when it comes to that particular saying, it means when the daughter is out of the house and not coming back. It is true that at certain ages, They’ll start receiving certain liberties and freedoms from their parents. It also depends on the Parent and their parenting style. Usually once a child reaches the age of 18, they are fully allowed to make their own decisions. Especially if they decide to move out of the house. While it may sound odd, it is correct to an extent.
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