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Ron Paul wants to eliminate federal student loans

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drman321 On December 28, 2013




, Florida
#16New Post! Oct 24, 2011 @ 16:56:49
@Lili Said

I'm not talking about interest rates. Where did I say anything about interest rates? Ron Paul's argument is that people shouldn't borrow in order to get through school.



No his argument is that the government shouldn't be subsidizing your interest rates.
jonnythan On August 02, 2014
Bringer of rad mirth


Deleted



Here and there,
#17New Post! Oct 24, 2011 @ 16:57:40
@Lili Said

The federal government didn't always do that, why do you think they started?


Same reason the federal government does pretty much anything... to buy political favor, earn money from special interest groups, and consolidate personal power.
Lili On July 12, 2019
....................





Sunshine Land,
#18New Post! Oct 24, 2011 @ 16:59:09
@jonnythan Said

It's not a zero sum game like that. Nothing works in so much isolation. The universities have raised tuition year after year in large part because the federal loans have enabled them to get away with it.



I agree with that. But putting in place a system that makes it so that poor people are less able to get the one thing that can free them from poverty doesn't seem like a good plan. Like I said, I don't know what a better plan would be, but just eliminating the ability to pay tuition for all but the already well-off doesn't seem like a good system, on it's own. There should be at least some kind of measure to make sure this doesn't disproportionately hit the poor the hardest.
jonnythan On August 02, 2014
Bringer of rad mirth


Deleted



Here and there,
#19New Post! Oct 24, 2011 @ 17:00:38
This plan would not eliminate the ability for students to pay for tuition.

It might decrease their ability to pay for tuition, especially at expensive private schools, but that will have the beneficial effect of forcing the private schools to lower their ridiculously overpriced rates.

Regardless, this isn't really any of the federal government's business. Remember, he wants to eliminate the Department of Education entirely.
Lili On July 12, 2019
....................





Sunshine Land,
#20New Post! Oct 24, 2011 @ 17:00:50
@drman321 Said

No his argument is that the government should be subsidizing your interest rates.


Did you read the article? He says people should all work through school like he did. No where in that article is he quoted saying anything about interest rates.
jonnythan On August 02, 2014
Bringer of rad mirth


Deleted



Here and there,
#21New Post! Oct 24, 2011 @ 17:03:10
@Lili Said

Did you read the article? He says people should all work through school like he did. No where in that article is he quoted saying anything about interest rates.


He said that he personally paid his way through college. He was making the point that this was possible decades ago and it really isn't possible right now because tuition is so high. He blames federal government intervention as one of the main reasons tuition is so high, and his plan is to let the market use its own forces to force tuition rates down.

He never says that everyone should work their way through school.
Lili On July 12, 2019
....................





Sunshine Land,
#22New Post! Oct 24, 2011 @ 17:05:36
@jonnythan Said

This plan would not eliminate the ability for students to pay for tuition.

It might decrease their ability to pay for tuition, especially at expensive private schools, but that will have the beneficial effect of forcing the private schools to lower their ridiculously overpriced rates.

Regardless, this isn't really any of the federal government's business. Remember, he wants to eliminate the Department of Education entirely.



I have no doubt tuition would go down, absolutely. But would it go down enough that someone who grew up on welfare could reasonably pull themselves up to another income class on their own? My concern is that the poorest people would have too high a barrier to entry, given where they're starting out.
boobagins On August 03, 2013
SPICY HOT TAMALES





Astral Weeks, Florida
#23New Post! Oct 24, 2011 @ 17:08:39
I think it's actually a good idea. Many first time students don't know zilch about finance, and fed loans look so much better than private loans and it's much easier to acquire. But the truth is, many are just not ready to handle loans.

I'm one of the lucky few that has been able to do all my schooling just through scholarships, no loans whatsoever, and very little out of my own pocket. Course, I worked hard for the scholarships, but so many of my friends have loans and they're drowning in debt.

And it's funny, but schools are actually shying away from providing federal loans now because it's such a hassle. They're turning the whole thing over to third parties.
jonnythan On August 02, 2014
Bringer of rad mirth


Deleted



Here and there,
#24New Post! Oct 24, 2011 @ 17:09:38
@Lili Said

I have no doubt tuition would go down, absolutely. But would it go down enough that someone who grew up on welfare could reasonably pull themselves up to another income class on their own? My concern is that the poorest people would have too high a barrier to entry, given where they're starting out.


Well welfare kids won't be going to Yale without scholarships or private loans, no. But tuition at state schools is generally between three and seven thousand dollars a year. That's low enough that you can work through college, even if you have to take every other semester off.
boobagins On August 03, 2013
SPICY HOT TAMALES





Astral Weeks, Florida
#25New Post! Oct 24, 2011 @ 17:10:18
Oh he also wants a policy where young people can opt out of paying social security.

I wouldn't mind that to be honest, but only if I get back everything I've already put in social security tax-free.
Lili On July 12, 2019
....................





Sunshine Land,
#26New Post! Oct 24, 2011 @ 17:12:06
@jonnythan Said

He said that he personally paid his way through college. He was making the point that this was possible decades ago and it really isn't possible right now because tuition is so high. He blames federal government intervention as one of the main reasons tuition is so high, and his plan is to let the market use its own forces to force tuition rates down.

He never says that everyone should work their way through school.



Ah, you're right, I misread that. However, decades ago a far lower percentage of the population was getting a degree at all. Does he think we should go back to that? Where, yes, tuition was lower, but far fewer people were getting degrees?
jonnythan On August 02, 2014
Bringer of rad mirth


Deleted



Here and there,
#27New Post! Oct 24, 2011 @ 17:13:24
@Lili Said

Ah, you're right, I misread that. However, decades ago a far lower percentage of the population was getting a degree at all. Does he think we should go back to that? Where, yes, tuition was lower, but far fewer people were getting degrees?


Well, whatever we were doing back then sure as s*** seemed to work better in terms of driving the economy.....

I don't think anyone can argue that the quality of education in this country has gone up in the last two decades.
jonnythan On August 02, 2014
Bringer of rad mirth


Deleted



Here and there,
#28New Post! Oct 24, 2011 @ 17:14:35
From the College Board:

Public four-year colleges charge, on average, $7,605 per year in tuition and fees for in-state students.

Public two-year colleges charge, on average, $2,713 per year in tuition and fees.


Those numbers don't sound insurmountable to me.
someone_else On August 30, 2012
Not a dude.


Deleted



American Alps, Washington
#29New Post! Oct 24, 2011 @ 17:17:22
@Lili Said

I have no doubt tuition would go down, absolutely. But would it go down enough that someone who grew up on welfare could reasonably pull themselves up to another income class on their own? My concern is that the poorest people would have too high a barrier to entry, given where they're starting out.



That's why there's scholarships though.
drman321 On December 28, 2013




, Florida
#30New Post! Oct 24, 2011 @ 17:17:23
@Lili Said

I have no doubt tuition would go down, absolutely. But would it go down enough that someone who grew up on welfare could reasonably pull themselves up to another income class on their own? My concern is that the poorest people would have too high a barrier to entry, given where they're starting out.



They would still be able to get student loans, just not through the government. I'm not sure what you aren't understanding here.
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