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Finding our humanity

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dookie On 2 minutes ago
Foolish Bombu





, United Kingdom
#1New Post! Aug 01, 2020 @ 20:58:53
Thomas Merton wrote in "Emblems of a Season of Fury" (1963),“It is my belief that we should not be too sure of having found Christ in ourselves until we have found him also in the part of humanity that is most remote from our own” and “God speaks, and God is to be heard, not only on Sinai, not only in my own heart, by in the voice of the stranger”

For me, Merton is speaking of finding our true humanity. I think his words are relevant irrespective of the beliefs we may live by, irrespective of any faith we have; even if we are atheists.

To know others, to think we may be able to learn from any other, to seek empathy towards others, is potentially to learn about ourselves.

All this without necessarily being in any way unfaithful to, or abandoning, our own current beliefs.
dookie On 2 minutes ago
Foolish Bombu





, United Kingdom
#2New Post! Aug 02, 2020 @ 07:54:02
I think, relevant to this, a further quote by a Buddhist speaking of the Dharma (which can mean in various contexts simply the Buddha's specific teaching or the way of the world)

"The dharma, can be discovered through the Buddhist tradition, but Buddhism is by no means the only source of dharma. I would define dharma as anything that awakens the enlightened mind and brings on the direct experience of selflessness. The teachings of Christ are perfumed with dharma. There is dharma in jazz, in beautiful gardens, in literature, in Sufi dance, in Quaker silence, in shaman healing, in projects to care for the homeless and clean up the inner cities, in Catholic ritual, in meaningful and competent work. There is dharma in anything that causes us to respect the innate softness and intelligence of ourselves and others. When the Buddhist system is applied properly, it does not turn us inward toward our own organizations, practices, and ideas. The system has succeeded when the Buddhist can recognize the true dharma at the core of all other religions and disciplines that are based on respect for the human image, and has no need to reject them."
Jennifer1984 On about 4 hours ago
Returner and proud





Penzance, United Kingdom
#3New Post! Aug 02, 2020 @ 17:31:38
I think education is a wonderful thing and the teachings of our deepest thinkers make a wonderful contribution to the advancement of human knowledge.

There are a lot of things though, that don't require a great deal of in-depth analysis to be understood at a level sufficient to live a decent and fulfilling life.

Hippocrates summed up, in three simple words, how to show respect, compasssion and care for all humankind: "Do no harm".

Sometimes, less is more.*





*And I'm aware that coming from me... the writer of the longest posts in the history of TFS......... that is quite a statement.
dookie On 2 minutes ago
Foolish Bombu





, United Kingdom
#4New Post! Aug 02, 2020 @ 17:59:28
@Jennifer1984 Said

I think education is a wonderful thing and the teachings of our deepest thinkers make a wonderful contribution to the advancement of human knowledge.

There are a lot of things though, that don't require a great deal of in-depth analysis to be understood at a level sufficient to live a decent and fulfilling life.

Hippocrates summed up, in three simple words, how to show respect, compasssion and care for all humankind: "Do no harm".

Sometimes, less is more.*





*And I'm aware that coming from me... the writer of the longest posts in the history of TFS......... that is quite a statement.



Someone once said that the more simple something is, the more difficult and complex it is to explain. That person may or may not have been a deep thinker.....

I genuinely find that "life's lessons" are on offer every moment of every day. If we presume that they can only come from "deep thinkers" (let alone the self proclaimed preachers in our midst) then most can easily pass us by.

On a more personal note, I found myself engulfed in our world's "Holy" books quite early on. In many ways, choice never came into it, more the cards I was dealt. We all have our own starting point, when (as the Good Book says!) we must begin to "work out our own salvation with fear and trembling."

We are all unique. We all have our "starting points". I think now that no "holy" Book or Faith is a necessity, but they have been my lifeblood.
Electric_Banana On August 08, 2020




, New Zealand
#5New Post! Aug 02, 2020 @ 18:03:01
@dookie Said

Thomas Merton wrote in "Emblems of a Season of Fury" (1963),“It is my belief that we should not be too sure of having found Christ in ourselves until we have found him also in the part of humanity that is most remote from our own” and “God speaks, and God is to be heard, not only on Sinai, not only in my own heart, by in the voice of the stranger”

For me, Merton is speaking of finding our true humanity. I think his words are relevant irrespective of the beliefs we may live by, irrespective of any faith we have; even if we are atheists.

To know others, to think we may be able to learn from any other, to seek empathy towards others, is potentially to learn about ourselves.

All this without necessarily being in any way unfaithful to, or abandoning, our own current beliefs.



Consideration and empathy go a long way in cranking up the intellectual channel and it's true we can, sometimes, see a higher intelligence vocalized by those around us

but as always I would suggest judgmental faith in our own intuition above all else and what is witnessed around us or through others; only fair and rational in an undisclosed existence by undisclosed hosts with undisclosed agenda.
Electric_Banana On August 08, 2020




, New Zealand
#6New Post! Aug 02, 2020 @ 18:10:30
@dookie Said

I think, relevant to this, a further quote by a Buddhist speaking of the Dharma (which can mean in various contexts simply the Buddha's specific teaching or the way of the world)

"The dharma, can be discovered through the Buddhist tradition, but Buddhism is by no means the only source of dharma. I would define dharma as anything that awakens the enlightened mind and brings on the direct experience of selflessness. The teachings of Christ are perfumed with dharma. There is dharma in jazz, in beautiful gardens, in literature, in Sufi dance, in Quaker silence, in shaman healing, in projects to care for the homeless and clean up the inner cities, in Catholic ritual, in meaningful and competent work. There is dharma in anything that causes us to respect the innate softness and intelligence of ourselves and others. When the Buddhist system is applied properly, it does not turn us inward toward our own organizations, practices, and ideas. The system has succeeded when the Buddhist can recognize the true dharma at the core of all other religions and disciplines that are based on respect for the human image, and has no need to reject them."



Earlier today I was on a Morae
I listened in carefully to see if I understood the general concept of Moari religion.
Aside from the cosmetic purpose of Earthen gods like Gaia their mission statement was simple and practical; "Do unto others..."

It's good to investigate the beliefs of others and then further practice seeing underneath the finer points and super-hero like illustrations to the underlying basic principles they try and promote; most of us find we are on the same page.
dookie On 2 minutes ago
Foolish Bombu





, United Kingdom
#7New Post! Aug 02, 2020 @ 19:25:05
@Electric_Banana Said

Consideration and empathy go a long way in cranking up the intellectual channel and it's true we can, sometimes, see a higher intelligence vocalized by those around us

but as always I would suggest judgmental faith in our own intuition above all else and what is witnessed around us or through others; only fair and rational in an undisclosed existence by undisclosed hosts with undisclosed agenda.



I love the use of the two words "judgemental faith"....

I'd just say that there need be no "agenda" as such.

Thanks
Jennifer1984 On about 4 hours ago
Returner and proud





Penzance, United Kingdom
#8New Post! Aug 03, 2020 @ 05:28:50
Too much convoluted philosophy.

I'll stick with "Do no harm."
dookie On 2 minutes ago
Foolish Bombu





, United Kingdom
#9New Post! Aug 03, 2020 @ 07:06:40
@Jennifer1984 Said

Too much convoluted philosophy.

I'll stick with "Do no harm."



Ah ha, long on posts, short on words to live by!



"Do no harm", a brief version of the so called Golden Rule, ubiquitous in the Holy Books of our world (with minor variations, leading to many devotees bickering with others as to whose Golden Rule is expressed and worded the best)

But still the suffering goes on.
Electric_Banana On August 08, 2020




, New Zealand
#10New Post! Aug 08, 2020 @ 22:37:19
@dookie Said

I love the use of the two words "judgemental faith"....

I'd just say that there need be no "agenda" as such.

Thanks



Ah, sorry - I meant putting our intuition first, above external stimuli, when making decisions.

Best example I can give is that a Christian preacher is meant to serve as medium for an immaculately sound entity (and yeah, that phrase just made me laugh out loud) yet Christian faith has lost many subscribers over the past two decades because they pushed the 'Gay Taboo' far enough that enough cracks were made in the 'Living Word' that shone some contradictory light through.

Here in people began trusting their own inner understanding more-so than others acting as middlemen; spoon-feeding that understanding along with their own herbs and spices.
dookie On 2 minutes ago
Foolish Bombu





, United Kingdom
#11New Post! Aug 09, 2020 @ 08:22:22
@Electric_Banana Said

Ah, sorry - I meant putting our intuition first, above external stimuli, when making decisions.

Best example I can give is that a Christian preacher is meant to serve as medium for an immaculately sound entity (and yeah, that phrase just made me laugh out loud) yet Christian faith has lost many subscribers over the past two decades because they pushed the 'Gay Taboo' far enough that enough cracks were made in the 'Living Word' that shone some contradictory light through.

Here in people began trusting their own inner understanding more-so than others acting as middlemen; spoon-feeding that understanding along with their own herbs and spices.


Yes, cut out the middle-men (or women!)
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