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The meanings of metaphors

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Conflict On about 22 hours ago




Girona, Spain
#1New Post! Nov 07, 2019 @ 14:55:30
I've heard many expressions in my lifetime and I have always found people and places to help me understand what they mean, but sometimes, like now, I have heard one that I can't find any references to.

During their brief feud with Kharma, the Bella Twins said a number of b****y things to her. She'd gotten pregnant and was one of the superheavyweight wrestlers, which made the writers write a number of insults to hurl at her because of her weight.

One of them was, regarding the man who had gotten Kharma pregnant, "you're as big as a blimp," I understood that part, but what I didn't get was the next one, "he must've gotten hooked with a seat belt."

What does this metaphor mean?
darkman666 On about 7 hours ago




Saint Louis, Missouri
#2New Post! Nov 07, 2019 @ 16:24:46
maybe she was too big for the seat belt, so they tied up on the roof top of the car with her seat belt. better than to hang up on meat hook and keep in the freezer.
DiscordTiger On about 7 hours ago
The Queen of Random

Administrator




Emerald City, United States (g
#5New Post! Nov 08, 2019 @ 04:21:22
I found the video clip of it from raw.

It’s definitely scripted, WWE writers are some more amazing and outrageous than some soap, drama and comedy writers. I totally get why it’s a good show and has a following.

But yeah the twins came out and interrupted kharma’s announcement she was taking maternity leave. And they tried to get in the sickest burn they could because kharma couldn’t kick their ass. So basically little f***ing chihuahuas* barking at the big dog knowing it was in a cage or on a leash.

WWE has some really cutting-edge pop culture references and really good taunts and to move along the story behind the matches. Really I think the McMahon organization has a lot of issues and problems, but they are good at the “showmanship” and finding talent.
These types of insults are classic mean girl s*** that happens in real life. Women are sometimes more insulting to each other than men are to them. I’d argue it’s a form of societal misogyny.

So yeah, while it’s not a “phrase” that you would come across say as often as “she’s the town bike” it’s putting together several ways women fight and trash talk/taunt each other.
Snarky a** remarks like that would be commonly thrown at each other in a chick fight. We’re f***ing brutal. So yeah, in the sense of a girl fight, that is believable that conglomerate of insults would have been thought up on the spot.
Conflict On about 22 hours ago




Girona, Spain
#6New Post! Nov 08, 2019 @ 15:19:18
@DiscordTiger Said

I found the video clip of it from raw.

It’s definitely scripted, WWE writers are some more amazing and outrageous than some soap, drama and comedy writers. I totally get why it’s a good show and has a following.

But yeah the twins came out and interrupted kharma’s announcement she was taking maternity leave. And they tried to get in the sickest burn they could because kharma couldn’t kick their ass. So basically little f***ing chihuahuas* barking at the big dog knowing it was in a cage or on a leash.

WWE has some really cutting-edge pop culture references and really good taunts and to move along the story behind the matches. Really I think the McMahon organization has a lot of issues and problems, but they are good at the “showmanship” and finding talent.
These types of insults are classic mean girl s*** that happens in real life.
Women are sometimes more insulting to each other than men are to them. I’d argue it’s a form of societal misogyny.

So yeah, while it’s not a “phrase” that you would come across say as often as “she’s the town bike” it’s putting together several ways women fight and trash talk/taunt each other.
Snarky a** remarks like that would be commonly thrown at each other in a chick fight. We’re f***ing brutal. So yeah, in the sense of a girl fight, that is believable that conglomerate of insults would have been thought up on the spot.



Thanks a lot for your feedback. I now have a much better understanding of the subject. I would like to offer my own interpretation of a series of clipped lines that are spoken in a kind of vernacular slang to state a group's intentions, used in "Big" one of WWE's old rap songs from the WWF Aggression album. The metaphors are largely symbolic and based on African American idiosyncrasies and street jargon

"Hoo bangin"................ partying
"Getin' scrilla"............... taking out money.
"y'all check the rhyme"......... find a music theme everyone wants to hear.
"G's in"..................... a thousand has been spent.
"2K"......................... the 21st century
"99's behind"................. the last year of the millennium is over.
"Behold, front line".......... the best is coming now
"It's our time to shine"...... It's time for us to get our glory.

How would we put all this together to make a song in layman's terms?
DiscordTiger On about 7 hours ago
The Queen of Random

Administrator




Emerald City, United States (g
#7New Post! Nov 08, 2019 @ 21:36:47
@Conflict Said

Thanks a lot for your feedback. I now have a much better understanding of the subject. I would like to offer my own interpretation of a series of clipped lines that are spoken in a kind of vernacular slang to state a group's intentions, used in "Big" one of WWE's old rap songs from the WWF Aggression album. The metaphors are largely symbolic and based on African American idiosyncrasies and street jargon

"Hoo bangin"................ partying
"Getin' scrilla"............... taking out money.
"y'all check the rhyme"......... find a music theme everyone wants to hear.
"G's in"..................... a thousand has been spent.
"2K"......................... the 21st century
"99's behind"................. the last year of the millennium is over.
"Behold, front line".......... the best is coming now
"It's our time to shine"...... It's time for us to get our glory.

How would we put all this together to make a song in layman's terms?


Honestly, I'd tell the layman to get with the program and African American slang and jargon is American jargon, so get used to it and learn it. It doesn't need to be translated.

But I suspect that is not exactly what you mean with the question. So I wouldn't necessarily get as snarky, because I know you. But some of your question phrasing, sounds like "fighting words" and I think you honestly asking for understanding not the passive-aggressive asking to prove a point like trolling. I also dont expect you to understand how seemingly innocent sounding questions or statements are like dog whistles (or codes to those that "hear what you are saying" that some part of the population is being "insulted" African American vernacular English (AAVE)is inherently *inferior* to "proper american English" where its more of a dialect and some translation is needed. So much of AAVE has passed into generalized american culture and popular culture. Like: "woke" "bae" and "ain't"


Now I know you aren't american, so there are things you don't understand, the same that I don't understand slang and jargon from Spain or England even though I understand both English and Spanish.

Soo... I could help you understand concepts in a song to make it more understandable, but I wouldn't know how to remake it in layman terms. Especially since a lot about a song requires rhyme and changing the words and all the syllables would make it not work, in a word for word translation. Kind of how screenplays have to me looked over y a native speaker and not necessarily just run through google translate. Unless you want an effect similar to some particularly hilarious Asian to English dubbed films.

Also, I'm not sure some of your approximations would be exactly correct in this instance:

We get in, where we fit in, y'all know the time
Hoo-Bangin', gettin scrilla, y'all check the rhyme
G's in, 2K, nine-nine's behind
Behold, frontline, it's our time to shine

So the meaning line per line would be something to the effect:
we all go through life and succeed where there are others like us, that support us, you know how it goes (remember how it was for you and where you fit in)
My record label is making money, check out my songs
The money has been invested, it's the new millennium, the past is behind
us
Look, all of you watching, we are going to succeed!
(most likely his record label "Hoo-Bangin" is going to become "big" )

Normally I'd agree ho(e)-banging could be partying or having lots of sex with promiscuous women, but with that spelling, placement and knowing the artist: it's the proper mane of his record label/company. Like Aftermath was Dr. Dre's label, and when it appears in raps it usually means the company or business rather than the "things that happen after"

I hope that makes that particular chorus make sense.

Slang and metaphors and things like that are confusing, when you aren't part of the culture. There are a lot of phrases I dont always understand at first either. Urban dictionary helps a little, but sometimes it just isn't obvious to get the exact words to rephrase it, but you can get to the meaning behind the communication.

frontline is also a word that has a lot of different connotations depending on how it is used and the context of the situation. So if its a concert it could be the audience, if it's a store, it's going to be the cashiers, if it's in a combat situation, it's the first people in, or the first group of defense, in a business office it would be the reception or security, who ever greets/deals with the customers. It's the whole context of the rest of the chorus that made me think mack 10 means his audience, supporters, fans. for frontline


also I realized I had to use phrases to explain this that are also a type of jargon/metaphor, Such as "dog-whistle" So if something doesn't make sense, let me know, and I can find a new way to express it.
Conflict On about 22 hours ago




Girona, Spain
#8New Post! Nov 11, 2019 @ 00:04:26
@DiscordTiger Said

Honestly, I'd tell the layman to get with the program and African American slang and jargon is American jargon, so get used to it and learn it. It doesn't need to be translated.

But I suspect that is not exactly what you mean with the question. So I wouldn't necessarily get as snarky, because I know you. But some of your question phrasing, sounds like "fighting words" and I think you honestly asking for understanding not the passive-aggressive asking to prove a point like trolling. I also dont expect you to understand how seemingly innocent sounding questions or statements are like dog whistles (or codes to those that "hear what you are saying" that some part of the population is being "insulted" African American vernacular English (AAVE)is inherently *inferior* to "proper american English" where its more of a dialect and some translation is needed. So much of AAVE has passed into generalized american culture and popular culture. Like: "woke" "bae" and "ain't"


Now I know you aren't american, so there are things you don't understand, the same that I don't understand slang and jargon from Spain or England even though I understand both English and Spanish.

Soo... I could help you understand concepts in a song to make it more understandable, but I wouldn't know how to remake it in layman terms. Especially since a lot about a song requires rhyme and changing the words and all the syllables would make it not work, in a word for word translation. Kind of how screenplays have to me looked over y a native speaker and not necessarily just run through google translate. Unless you want an effect similar to some particularly hilarious Asian to English dubbed films.

Also, I'm not sure some of your approximations would be exactly correct in this instance:

We get in, where we fit in, y'all know the time
Hoo-Bangin', gettin scrilla, y'all check the rhyme
G's in, 2K, nine-nine's behind
Behold, frontline, it's our time to shine

So the meaning line per line would be something to the effect:
we all go through life and succeed where there are others like us, that support us, you know how it goes (remember how it was for you and where you fit in)
My record label is making money, check out my songs
The money has been invested, it's the new millennium, the past is behind
us
Look, all of you watching, we are going to succeed!
(most likely his record label "Hoo-Bangin" is going to become "big" )

Normally I'd agree ho(e)-banging could be partying or having lots of sex with promiscuous women, but with that spelling, placement and knowing the artist: it's the proper mane of his record label/company. Like Aftermath was Dr. Dre's label, and when it appears in raps it usually means the company or business rather than the "things that happen after"

I hope that makes that particular chorus make sense.

Slang and metaphors and things like that are confusing, when you aren't part of the culture. There are a lot of phrases I dont always understand at first either. Urban dictionary helps a little, but sometimes it just isn't obvious to get the exact words to rephrase it, but you can get to the meaning behind the communication.

frontline is also a word that has a lot of different connotations depending on how it is used and the context of the situation. So if its a concert it could be the audience, if it's a store, it's going to be the cashiers, if it's in a combat situation, it's the first people in, or the first group of defense, in a business office it would be the reception or security, who ever greets/deals with the customers. It's the whole context of the rest of the chorus that made me think mack 10 means his audience, supporters, fans. for frontline


also I realized I had to use phrases to explain this that are also a type of jargon/metaphor, Such as "dog-whistle" So if something doesn't make sense, let me know, and I can find a new way to express it.



Great answer. Very insightful. I will have to refer to it in the future.

Here is another series of metaphors I find curious, from Ice Cube's theme song from the Street Fighter (1994), soundtrack CD...

Before you come in my house nigga take off your Nikes
And bow, and I'll show you how to withstand this
Cannabis, phantomous praying mantis
It's like Chinese arithmetic
Cause you never ever thought you'd see the Dragon saggin

What is the metaphor of the Nikes and bowing, the cannabis and the house?
darkman666 On about 7 hours ago




Saint Louis, Missouri
#9New Post! Nov 11, 2019 @ 01:58:06
Before you come in my house nigga take off your Nikes
leory- take off gosh darn shoes, I just mopped the floor.

And bow, and I'll show you how to withstand this
if you bend over, your fart will come more better and louder.

Cannabis, phantomous praying mantis
smoke it and pray you walk straight in the morning

It's like Chinese arithmetic
don't you ever see latin before!

Cause you never ever thought you'd see the Dragon sagging
you don't look too hot naked either, lady!
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