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Child Beauty Pageants: Right or Wrong?

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twilitezone911 On March 25, 2019




Saint Louis, Missouri
#31New Post! Mar 28, 2017 @ 22:09:26
@Jennifer1984 Said

I rather thought that Little Miss Sunshine used the Pageant scenario as a satire on dysfunctional families.

No, I don't agree with pageants either. I wouldn't put my daughter in one. Truth be told, they're rather rare here.

I was sent to dance classes as a child and took part in shows, but that was as part of a troupe doing something as a group. We were all friends and it was fun. Our costumes were appropriate to the piece we were performing. A tutu is not a sexual garment.

A pageant is an individual event, and no matter how much the participants attempt to avoid it, I think it DOES sexualise the child. It also sets child against child in a competitive environment that most children of that age simply don't have the cognitive ability to either understand or cope with.

Definitely wrong in my opinion.



jennifer going write as a satire of dysfunctional families, but it is more than a traditional function, probably came you all across the pond.

many wealthy women or even middle class mothers, somewhere in turn of the century. women want to have proper etiquette for young women.

when i was a kid and teenager that girls and boys learn etiquette. it a frown on to belch and fart at the dinner, not open your mouth and houseflies come out of it.

do you know my sister is a good belcher at dinner table, i was pretty good fart myself. ( that funny, twilite, mommy would proud of me, that can fart " god bless america " in the seven inning stretch at ball game. )

in some schools, they do teach your kids, how behavior with proper manners at your dinner. even they teach set a table and service food for others.

actually, i learned my property manners at camp.

i remember when i was a kid on one sunday morning, we having on sunday breakfast, we had scrambling eggs.

our family dog was under the dining table. all sudden, we heard a big rippable sound , everybody look me. i said that was me.

all sudden, a horrible smell came around the room, it stop us from eating our eggs. we found out, it was our family dog laid big one. she was sleep during the time.

fifteen or twenty minutes later, we all came back to the dining table to finished our breakfast.

jennifer - there is a fine line of healthy competition of young women to compete with each others, but it seem that mothers are the problems not the daughters.

the daughters try to please their mothers to do their best be really good in ballet school, and other proper manners lessons to fit in their mother's society.

most mothers don't want their children to embarrass them. most mothers went through the same thing , when we were daughters.

instead having these child beauty pageants for mothers and daughters. let fathers and sons have their own beauty pageants.

now, i an understand why they want rid to get competition out of public schools or any competition for young kids. what do they learn from this? seriously, without competition for young kids. how to learn things that help them to prepare them into adulthood.

i think competition like beauty pageants need to be more supervisor that dealing mothers. to make sure the kids are having fun, not dominate them be failure in their adult life.
Jennifer1984 On about 10 hours ago
Returner and proud





Penzance, United Kingdom
#32New Post! Mar 29, 2017 @ 04:35:12
Hmmmm. Interesting.

I quite understand the "competitive instinct". If you ever saw me on the lacrosse field as a teenager, or on the rugby pitch as a Student or the netball court with my local team.... you'd wonder where that peace-to-all, pacifist anti-war campaigner went. I play to win, mate.

I would be quite in agreement if you argued that competition can be helpful in producing well balanced children.

But it's about the "balance", isn't it...? By the time I played competitive sports I was capable of understanding that it was a game. That the match lasted for a certain duration and during that time we could.... and should.... do our very best. We learned teamwork.... responsibility (to the team).... the will to succeed.... the desire to be seen to be doing our best.

But at the end of the game we shook hands, the game was won or lost. Nothing could be changed after the final whistle. As long as we'd done our best, honour and rivalry was satisfied. It was now time to put competition aside. To socialise with our opponents in friendship. We understood those things because we were at an age.... we'd developed to the point... where we could.

But children of pageant age don't understand these things. I said in my previous post about the cognizant abilities of children. This is a significant factor in the discussion in my opinion.

If I were to put my daughter into one of these competitions (and competitions they are. The word "pageant" is nothing more than branding) then sure, she may, at first, have some fun dressing up. She may even enjoy the element of play in learning a little song or a dance routine.

But when learning that song or that dance to perfection becomes onerous then the fun wanes. When mummy demands "Do it again" for the umpteenth time because she didn't quite get the shuffle, ball, change correct on the third beat of the measure and she has to do it over.... and overl..... and over......

There aint no fun in that, mate.

And who are they doing it for, anyway..? What's the purpose of it..? To please mummy..?

I can't help feeling that the element of parental vanity is never far from the surface in these events. The winning parent gets to lord it over the other parents and be Queen Bee for the day. Therein, methinks, lies the true motivation for entering small children with very little realisation of what is going on.

And I wonder - perhaps you can tell me - do these children mix after the event..? Do they socialise with each other Are they friends..? is there any sense of "hard competition but fair play" making for good, well balanced young people...? I rather suspect the winner and her gushing parents are too busy being photographed and holding court to mix with LOSERS. And those who didn't win are taken home in a silent car. The little girl sitting in the back knowing that she LOST and MUST DO BETTER NEXT TIME.

I think that must be terrifying for some children. And I repeat: Where's the fun in that..? If pageants teach children anything at all, they teach them all the wrong lessons.

Pre-school children will learn how to have fun... dress up... discover their ability to dance or run or catch a ball... in their own time in the course of normal play with their peers. They'll work out who is good at climbing in the playground, and who is good at singing when they join in with songtime on the TV. And they'll develop in their own time, at their own pace, in their own way.

They don't need to be force-marched onto a stage to act like performing monkeys in front of a panel of adults who will judge them and put them in some arbitrary order of superiority.

That just aint fun.
twilitezone911 On March 25, 2019




Saint Louis, Missouri
#33New Post! Mar 29, 2017 @ 12:03:05
teamwork is taught at early ages not only competition, help build character, and you always kill teammates later, they stink at sports.

pre-school children in the us, i missed those days, we had a healthy competition playing soccer in ballfield that had landmines. if the landmine didn't kill, you have health a game of soccer.

those relay races with a stick of dynamite in their hands, and lit the sticks. watch the competition, watch the kids try to get to the finish line, before the stick blow. of course, a great game to watch who doesn't like watch kids being blow, right, jennifer?

those obstacle courses for kids dodge love live ammos to shoot at the kids, this is not only competition. boys, these obstacle courses with quicksands, live electrical ( full charge, of course, on ) barred wires that boys have climbing on over to get the next obstacle.

other fun stuff for boys to prepare for them to be men.

for the girls, to fine women. girls to have balance for them probably snobby wealth socialites. pre-school girls learn balance on a tightrope over a big vase of acid.

jennifer- how pre-schools in usa, teach their kids deal with competition to make america strong.

jennifer - god, i missed those days, when i was a kid.
mrmhead On about 3 hours ago




NE, Ohio
#34New Post! Mar 29, 2017 @ 12:06:21
@Jennifer1984 Said

A pageant is an individual event, and no matter how much the participants attempt to avoid it, I think it DOES sexualise the child. It also sets child against child in a competitive environment that most children of that age simply don't have the cognitive ability to either understand or cope with.

Definitely wrong in my opinion.


I get the impression it is also (more so) Mommy against Mommy
Jennifer1984 On about 10 hours ago
Returner and proud





Penzance, United Kingdom
#35New Post! Mar 30, 2017 @ 04:38:52
@twilitezone911 Said

teamwork is taught at early ages not only competition, help build character, and you always kill teammates later, they stink at sports.

pre-school children in the us, i missed those days, we had a healthy competition playing soccer in ballfield that had landmines. if the landmine didn't kill, you have health a game of soccer.

those relay races with a stick of dynamite in their hands, and lit the sticks. watch the competition, watch the kids try to get to the finish line, before the stick blow. of course, a great game to watch who doesn't like watch kids being blow, right, jennifer?

those obstacle courses for kids dodge love live ammos to shoot at the kids, this is not only competition. boys, these obstacle courses with quicksands, live electrical ( full charge, of course, on ) barred wires that boys have climbing on over to get the next obstacle.

other fun stuff for boys to prepare for them to be men.

for the girls, to fine women. girls to have balance for them probably snobby wealth socialites. pre-school girls learn balance on a tightrope over a big vase of acid.

jennifer- how pre-schools in usa, teach their kids deal with competition to make america strong.

jennifer - god, i missed those days, when i was a kid.



You are one sick puppy, Twilight, but ya make me laff..!!

I don't quite think I'll be entering my daughter for the playing of rounders with a live grenade rather than a ball, or the triple jump in a minefield. I'm kinda figuring that ski jumping over the Grand Canyon is also not on the list of events to try.

Now... please bear with me.

I'll share a little secret with the group here. My little girl is a real water baby. She loves the water and we go swimming at least twice a week. Given the chance, she'd go swimming every day. She learned to swim very quickly and for a girl who is barely four years old, she's already very strong in the water.

I had a little daydream once and it sometimes comes back to me where I imagine that, one day, I'll see her stand up on a rostrum next to a swimming pool somewhere in the world and the announcer will say ...... "and the gold medalist and Olympic Champion, representing Great Britain, Megan R......."

My baby, all grown up by then, will step up on the middle box of the rostrum, smiling and waving while her mums sit in the stands and cry tears of pride.

I know... it'll probably never happen but I guess many parents have daydreams like that at some time or another. I'm not abashed by my little fancy. It's quite normal to want your child to do something special.

As soon as she starts full time school I'll let her join the swimming club if there is one. She'll love it. But we don't have racing events for children of her age here. Our child swimming clubs are about learning to be safe in the water.... to have fun... to learn life saving skills.

Does this make the British less able to compete at the highest level, over countries where competition among small children is commonplace? Probably. Certainly the Olympic medals table would tend to suggest it does. But in our way, we're pretty comfortable with what we do achieve.

Indeed, I argue that even if our sporting achievements are less "glorious", then the success we do achieve is all the greater for being won against the odds..... against winning-obsessed automatons....

Missy Franklin is a great champion and I admire her very much, but she started competitive swimming when she was five and by the age of seven was competing against girls much older that herself. Kudos to her for winning five Olympic medals by the age of 17, but to achieve that she sacrificed her childhood.

I'd never want that for my daughter. If my little pipe-dream ever did come true then (as the dream goes), she'd have her moment of glory in her early twenties and once would be enough. After that she might retire from competitive swimming and settle into a career and a life.

How many gold medals does a person need..?


And so it is with these "pageants". Such things produce young people who have never really been children. Forced into a regime of almost ancient-Sparta proportions from an early age. That's not a childhood no matter how many competitions they win. And if that's a measure of what makes a country "strong", then I'd never want my child to grow up in such a place.

Let children be children. Let them grow and learn at their own pace. As for competitive success..? What will be will be. If they've "got it", then the competitive drive and determination to win will surface in its own time. That's when you get behind your child and support them all the way to the top.

Be the supportive parent.... the parent who drives her to swim club time after time... who cheers like crazy from the grandstand... who whoops and hollers when she wins a race, but is there to put a consoling arm around her when she loses. Hugs can count as much as medals, you know.

But don't be the pushy parent. The one who drags her through a training regime she's not ready for... who pounds her mentally until she can think of nothing else.... Who drives her into depression if she loses because she thinks she's let you down.

I agree with MrMHead above about parent vs parent. Sometimes, parents aren't pushing for the sake of their child. Sometimes they want the gainsay... the reflected glory.... for themselves.

Parents like that should be ashamed of themselves.
twilitezone911 On March 25, 2019




Saint Louis, Missouri
#36New Post! Mar 30, 2017 @ 11:50:36
i remember in 60's, when i learned how to swim at jcca,in a public swimming pool.

i had a swimming pool in my backyard, it was a hard learn to swim in our pool.

i had three annoying things, moe, larry, and curry, not the three stoogies in my swimming pool.

three stoggies part of the deal with the house, my father brought for us. how learning to swim, in a swimming pool, when you three goofy sharks in it?
Kibbity_Kabbit On October 16, 2017




Memphis, Tennessee
#37New Post! Jun 26, 2017 @ 14:00:02
If it's something the kid really enjoys, then have at it! Although, some parents do have their children doing sexual things far too young sometimes. I've seen quite a few videos of pageant girls twerking for their dance or talent portion & they were not at all old enough to be doing s*** like that. Very cringe-y & highly inappropriate.
Jennifer1984 On about 10 hours ago
Returner and proud





Penzance, United Kingdom
#38New Post! Jun 27, 2017 @ 04:25:58
@AllieKLong Said

When I was three years old, I participated in my first beauty pageants. I won first place in my first show. Ever since then, beauty pageants have been a passion of mine. I remember when I was a little girl. I always loved to dress up and play with my mom's makeup (she didn't know). With beauty pageants I could do that. When I got to do a beauty pageant, I was excited. My parents have videotaped all of my pageants all the way from me getting ready to my performance. When I watch the videos, I don't see a little girl who doesn't want to do this & is forced into doing it, but I see a little girl who is genuinely happy. I do not believe child beauty pageants are wrong. If you force your kid to do it, then it's wrong. I think that when you force your child into doing this pageant, you need to rethink your parenting styles because you obviously have a problem. Many people think that dressing your child up & making her look and feel beautiful is wrong. I enjoyed doing that as a child. I loved it. If you think the beauty pageants are too sexual, you are mistaken. The beauty pageants are not that way. If your a perverted man watching the child beauty pageants and you think that way, that's your problem. Not the beauty pageants problem.




I did exactly the same things as a child that you did, without the pageants though. My parents sent me to dance classes from age 6 and I loved them, but there was no competition involved. The shows my dance school put on were brilliant, but it was all about having a good time. No prizes were ever handed out or even competed for. Madam Dorothy wouldn't have that. And I can see why.

As a very small girl I would dress up too and enjoyed it. It's a perfectly normal thing for a little girl to do. I haven't caught my 4 year old daughter doing this with my things yet but I'm sure that at some point she will. She has a box of dressing up things she can play with and she does this with her friends when they come to our house to play. They have a lot of fun. But I'm in no doubt that she'll see me wearing something and think "I wonder what I look like as a grown up". That's how it starts, doesn't it..? <smiles at the memory>

She doesn't do the make up thing because neither myself nor my wife use make up so there isn't any there for her to get curious about, but again, I'm sure that at some point she will see her friends doing this when she plays at their house, and she'll join in too. I can't begin to imagine the mess they'll make of their faces, but I bet it'll be a blast for them..!!

But these things are all in play. All in fun. It's all about discovery. And it's all perfectly normal, healthy and natural.

Beauty pageants though, are about competition. Putting a child AGAINST other children. Instilling the notion that they must do this or wear that, not because they want to but because they MUST in order to WIN.

Sure, some of it will be enjoyable for certain children... especially the winners....

But I have watched some of these pageants when they've been shown on TV and I see also the tears of those who don't win. The disappointment. The sense that they've failed. That they've let their parents down.

There's no fun in that.

Now..... I'm a competitive sporting woman. I play sport (netball, mostly these days). I was highly competitive as a schoolgirl. I played tennis, lacrosse, netball and at university I played women's rugby too..!! And I play to win. Fairly, but with determination to do my best and achieve a winning outcome.

I was brought up with sporting values. That you can't win them all, and when the game is over you shake hands with your opponent, win lose or draw. Everybody goes for a drink together and you make friends. The disappointment of losing a game is assuaged by knowing that you've benefited by making friends and you've played to a noble sporting ideal. You did your best, and hey, there's always the next game to win.

I see none of that in child beauty pageants. No "noble ideal". No making of friends. Only competitors. Only opponents. Winning is not the best thing, it's the ONLY thing. Nobody remembers the silver medalist. Being first is winning, everything else is losing. Yep, I've heard all the cliches.

I don't want my little girl to be that child. I don't ever want her to feel she's failed. That she wasn't good enough. I don't want her to feel she ever let her mothers down.


So, what does my little girl do..? Well, she loves to swim. She's a proper little water baby and we go to the pool at least twice a week (it'd be every day if she had her way..!!) and she loves it. She's a very competent swimmer at her age and is completely at home in the water.

Now, I wrote on another post recently that I have a little daydream sometimes. My little fantasy dream is that one day, perhaps in about twenty years from now, she will stand up on an Olympic podium and have a gold medal hung around her neck. My heart would burst with pride.

But am I going to push her toward that goal...? Not a chance in hell.

I'll encourage her to always do the best she can in everything and I'll be there when she needs me. And if she decides she wants to swim competitively, then I'll do the driving to meets and galas... I'll do the "getting up at 5 am to take her to early morning training" thing. I'll do everything she needs to be successful.

Who knows..? One day my little pipe dream may come true.

If it does, it does. If not, well, she won't be diminished in my eyes by one little bit.

In my opinion, pushy parents do more harm than good. Those who push their children into competitive events too soon.... and not just beauty pageants, but any competitive environment.... take all the fun, natural inquisitiveness and sense of discovery out of their child's development.

Let children be children. Let them find things for themselves. Let them grow in their own space and time.

Let them have their time as little ones, when everything is new and exciting and full of wonder. Goodness knows, they won't be children for very long.
twilitezone911 On March 25, 2019




Saint Louis, Missouri
#39New Post! Jun 27, 2017 @ 07:17:55
last summer, i watching on cable, i forget what it was called. it was mothers that take their daughters on beauty contests. the teacher, she was look like she ate few kids. she was big doggie. it was cancelled, because the teacher wasn't faking, about verbal abusing the children.

she was contently very abusing the child, who was 6 to 8 years old. the mothers were no better than the teacher.the competition was high, but no reason why the child need to be in that competitive atmosphere.

my sisters were beauty pageants, they were before. when they were kids. i am sorry, my sisters were in dog shows, they won first and second prizes. my family dog, she was always came third place. she was an englisgh sheepdog. with my sisters's beauty, my dolly didn't have change against them.

my sisters dressed up in my mom's clothes, when they were kids. i remember when i really little i remember trying on my mom's high heels. i almost got a nose bleed i felt was soo tall, i can reach the ceiling. my mom was 5'2, she was normal. it isn't like she had jump to reach the door's handle, she had jump to look out the hole of the door. i am joking, she used a step ladder to see out. i thinking my mom , she would be giving an evil eye and give lecture on talking about her like this. normally, my mom was alive, we would getting ready see my sisters at the kennel on the annual bbq 4 th july kennelfest weekend in few days.

in 60's, when i was a kid, my sisters were taught hold a book over their head. they try to balance the book on their heads. i never could understand how snoby kids can hold a silver spoon in their mouths, then they grew up as an adult. the silver spoon would stick up and out their asses.

little girls should have fun, dressing up like their mothers. little girls need role models. i don't think really models, that are really interest, i think like put on make up.

putting on war paints to dress up like their mothers does to face the business world. that more competition than beauty pageants. in 60's, it probably taboo that mothers. that mothers were had a job, but motherhood, not good enough to a pernment job for them. these days, that make no sense that june clever or carol brady is the kind of life, my mom had to face in 60's.

there is a lot of women, want more out of life or force to have job to make an end it. women that juggle between motherhood and career, that really doesn't need a man in their life, or even they do. i find them impress out of respect.

i like to think that maybe who believe that motherhood is more career than a regular job is more important than being a woman. as a man, when i was growing up, that i had force see men believe that women , were better stayed in the kitchen and bedroom. it is sad that are women don't think or have courage to be independent on their own.

i question how important these child pageant contests. they for child or the mothers. i keep thinking of joan crawford and coat hanger, what happen to her in childhood?

it seem that child beauty pageants has a good intent to help little girls to get values to teach them to act to better woman than other little girls who doesn't these pageants.

since, we are little we force to compete with each others. in society, in schools, it seem like parents want their child. it in certain society classes, it demand not request to put your child in sort of contest or pageants for the parent to acceptable.

where i went to school in a public rich snobby environment, my parents were middle class. my high school class, you were rich, grades were a, or on some type of afternoon sport or school programs, you fit in.

their stigma that child beauty pageants have over mothers, who enter their daughters. is really healthy for either one of them? or the pageants are design for what society or society classes wants women to be more than men wants.

maybe it not man's fault that that women need to be a second rate citizen in backward times before. man can accept modern independent women, but the society take longer to accept them.

maybe society or what man have been taught or the idealism. that man need to be in command, not over women. in sense, of control, as acceptable. i am not blame man are blind or force to believe that women, or the fact that women are force or have change to fit with man . but not their equal.

the society is compete at fault in this matter, when will society accept women are more than stepford wives?
Eaglebauer On July 23, 2019
Moderator
Deleted



Saint Louis, Missouri
#40New Post! Jun 27, 2017 @ 12:17:01
@twilitezone911 Said

the society is compete at fault in this matter, when will society accept women are more than stepford wives?



Do you really believe that society hasn't accepted this at large yet?

I mean sure, you can point to pageants and say they are examples of public objectification, and you'd be absolutely right. I don't agree with the idea behind them and would love to see them altogether stopped completely, but I also think they are, thankfully, on the way out and very much on the fringe of society nowadays.

And let's be honest...it isn't only women who are objectified. You have plus sized female models to put forth the (correct) idea that not only thin women can be attractive and that having only one standard for what female beauty is is harmful and unrealistic. How many plus sized male models do you see in advertisements? How many standards are there for what makes a man physically attractive that are widely accepted?

I'm not naive enough to say that men suffer as much as women do when it comes to physical objectification. We do, actually, suffer more objectification when it comes to things like success and money and power and we're expected to be earners who provide by most of society. But women classically have absolutely been expected to be pretty and well shaped and physically attractive...and if they aren't and end up being successful in the workplace, they're seen as sexless man killers. And yes, that's bulls***.

But I don't know that I agree that society at large hasn't caught on that women are more than Stepford wives, and I think it does more service to first wave feminists who paved the way to acknowledge the advancements that they fought for and caused.
twilitezone911 On March 25, 2019




Saint Louis, Missouri
#41New Post! Jun 27, 2017 @ 12:35:17
@Eaglebauer Said

Do you really believe that society hasn't accepted this at large yet?

I mean sure, you can point to pageants and say they are examples of public objectification, and you'd be absolutely right. I don't agree with the idea behind them and would love to see them altogether stopped completely, but I also think they are, thankfully, on the way out and very much on the fringe of society nowadays.

And let's be honest...it isn't only women who are objectified. You have plus sized female models to put forth the (correct) idea that not only thin women can be attractive and that having only one standard for what female beauty is is harmful and unrealistic. How many plus sized male models do you see in advertisements? How many standards are there for what makes a man physically attractive that are widely accepted?

I'm not naive enough to say that men suffer as much as women do when it comes to physical objectification. We do, actually, suffer more objectification when it comes to things like success and money and power and we're expected to be earners who provide by most of society. But women classically have absolutely been expected to be pretty and well shaped and physically attractive...and if they aren't and end up being successful in the workplace, they're seen as sexless man killers. And yes, that's bulls***.

But I don't know that I agree that society at large hasn't caught on that women are more than Stepford wives, and I think it does more service to first wave feminists who paved the way to acknowledge the advancements that they fought for and caused.



i was writing this, and thinking of of a world of " 1984 " setting. of course, the society has accept this at large, it created it, as entertainment.

i wasn't think physical attraction beyond kids, not adult or plus size girls. because these kid's beauty pageants have plus-size kids in it for amuse purposes and embarrassment. that is wrong , many levels.

many ways, you look at child or regular beauty pageants as the ugly size of how society treat their citizens. not something look as a beauty and and a human being.

simply as an exhibit, under glass to just stare at.
Jennifer1984 On about 10 hours ago
Returner and proud





Penzance, United Kingdom
#42New Post! Jun 27, 2017 @ 17:32:02
@Eaglebauer Said

Do you really believe that society hasn't accepted this at large yet?

I mean sure, you can point to pageants and say they are examples of public objectification, and you'd be absolutely right. I don't agree with the idea behind them and would love to see them altogether stopped completely, but I also think they are, thankfully, on the way out and very much on the fringe of society nowadays.

And let's be honest...it isn't only women who are objectified. You have plus sized female models to put forth the (correct) idea that not only thin women can be attractive and that having only one standard for what female beauty is is harmful and unrealistic. How many plus sized male models do you see in advertisements? How many standards are there for what makes a man physically attractive that are widely accepted?

I'm not naive enough to say that men suffer as much as women do when it comes to physical objectification. We do, actually, suffer more objectification when it comes to things like success and money and power and we're expected to be earners who provide by most of society. But women classically have absolutely been expected to be pretty and well shaped and physically attractive...and if they aren't and end up being successful in the workplace, they're seen as sexless man killers. And yes, that's bulls***.

But I don't know that I agree that society at large hasn't caught on that women are more than Stepford wives, and I think it does more service to first wave feminists who paved the way to acknowledge the advancements that they fought for and caused.


William G Tapley in his book "The Dutch Blue Error" makes a telling comment: " But it saddened me, and I couldn't allow her to turn into a Stepford wife, a mindless servant to what she thought were my wishes and needs.

It's accurate, I think, in as much as very few men really want their wives to behave in that way any more. It's something that feminism has been successful in, pretty much, consigning to the dustbin of history. The usual disclaimer applies... yeah, there are some like that, but fewer and fewer with every generation.

Getting back to pageants.... I'm glad to read that they are in decline in the US. I don't know whether there has been an organised campaign against them or they are simply dying a death by disinterest and / or public opprobrium.

Over here, such events have long been considered suspect... The sort of occasion in which children could be being covertly sexualised under the guise of an innocuous event. We have always been uncomfortable with pageants.

With the 2012 exposes of historic sexual abuse of children here, anything now that looks even slightly suspect quickly comes under intense public (and when it merits it, police) scrutiny.
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